Posts Tagged ‘Drama’

MOVIE: The Kings of Summer (2013)

December 31, 2013

kingsofsummerThis incredibly charming film is about two best friends, Joe and Patrick, sophomores in high school, who, one summer, decide they’ve had enough of their obnoxious parents and run away to live in the woods.

There, along with a third kid they hardly know, a delightfully weird little dude named Biaggio who attaches himself to them and won’t let go (“What is this kid doing here?” Patrick asks. “I don’t know,” Joe replies, “I’m afraid to tell him to leave — I don’t know what he’s capable of.”), they build themselves a pretty remarkable little house and begin going about the business of becoming men, sparsely-haired, teenaged mustaches and all.  (For 90 seconds of Biaggio awesomeness, by the way, go here — you can thank me later: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xqvImEZkHDI.)

As is usually the case with these things, it’s not long before a girl shows up and throws a long, blonde monkey wrench into the works, breaking up the band, so to speak.  Meanwhile, back at home, Patrick’s parents and Joe’s dad (Nick Offerman, essentially playing Ron Swanson with a teenage son), are working with the police to try to find their boys.

Patrick’s parents, who are the kind of lame-o dorks we all perceive our parents to be when we’re 15, mostly just seem befuddled.  It’s Joe’s dad who has the real transformation — after his wife died a few years back, he became emotionally shut-off from his kids, a gruff father with a lot of strict rules.  As the summer progresses, though, his initial fury over Joe’s behavior softens into exactly the kind of heartache I imagine most parents feel when their children leave home, the kind of heartache that reminds you why you put up with those crappy teenage years in the first place.

This is an utterly delightful film — overall one of the sweetest, warmest, and funniest pictures of 2013 for me.  Absolutely, totally, and completely recommended.  Go watch it right now.  RIGHT NOW, I SAID.

[Netflix it | Amazon Buy/Rent]

Genre: Drama, Comedy
Cast: Nick Robinson, Gabriel Basso, Moises Arias, Nick Offerman, Erin Moriarty, Craig Cackowski, Megan Mullally

MOVIE: Gravity (2013)

December 10, 2013

gravityRemember way back in 2006, when Les Stroud and Bear Grylls were co-Boyfriends in Chief, and I shared with you guys the list I keep of places I never, ever want to go to due to the fact: gruesome, terrifying death?

Yeah, well, you can now add “OUTER SPACE” to the top of that list. Yes, put it in all caps. In fact, do it like this — huge and insanely, blindingly red:

1. OUTER SPACE

I always thought I wanted to try space walking one day. Now I’m pretty sure I can never watch NASA TV ever again.

GOOD GOD.

Highly recommended, just like everybody else has told you it was.  Don’t forget to breathe.

[Prequeue at Netflix | View trailer]

Genre: HOLY SHIT, Science Fiction, Drama
Cast: Sandra Bullock, George Clooney, that other astronaut guy whom: alas, we hardly knew ye.

(p.s. WordPress, why you gotta be so weird with the formatting?)

MOVIE: Into the White (2012)

December 4, 2013

intothewhiteSet during WWII, or, more specifically, in the middle of the snowy nowhere in Norway during WWII, this little gem of a film tells the true story of two British and three German soldiers forced by extremely cold circumstances to work together to survive.

It starts with an air battle in the blinding snow.  Both sides end up going down — the British plane shoots the German one and then crashes itself.  Freezing, the two groups of crew miraculously manage to stumble across the same little cabin in the aforementioned middle of the snowy Norwegian nowhere — kismet!  Unable to do anything until winter abates and they can hike out, the five men have to learn to live together — something that comes much easier for the two eldest officers, who are about as war-weary as they come, than for the two young bucks who pretty much want to blow each other up REAL BAD (the roles of prisoners v. guards switch a few times, depending on who happened to grab the gun while the others were sleeping).

As time passes and tedium sets in, the men slowly get to know each other — something facilitated greatly, as is often the case, by the exciting discovery of a bunch of liquor stored under the floor boards.  Ultimately, grudging respect turns into full-on friendship, and they begin to make plans for getting out together and going home.

Annnnnd then the Norwegians ski in and ruin everything.  Ach, typical. (Oh wait, I’m part Norwegian. . . never mind, we’re awesome.)

Based on a true story (you can read about it here), this movie was incredibly engaging and entertaining.  It was also a pleasant surprise to see both Rupert Grint (Ron from the Harry Potter films) and Florian Lukas, whom I first saw in the mountain climbing film North Face and find just utterly and ridiculously handsome.  Grint did a surprisingly good job being cocky, which I would not have figured him for.

Good acting, great story, cute guys — what’s not to like?  Recommended!

[Stream on Netflix | Buy or rent from Amazon]

Genre: Drama, War, Foreign (in German, Norwegian, and English with subtitles)
Cast: Florian Lukas, David Kross, Stig Henrik Hoff, Lachlan Nieboer, Rupert Grint

MOVIE: Mud (2013)

June 12, 2013

mudEllis and his BFF Neckbone (“Neck” for short, because: obvs), are 14 year-old boys growing up poor in Arkansas.  Ellis lives on a houseboat on the Mississippi — his father is a fisherman — and he and Neck spend a lot of their free time zipping up and down the waterways in a boat, exploring the myriad islands that pepper the region.

One day, Neck takes Ellis to one of those island, eager to show him a discovery.  Out exploring, see, he’d come across the coolest thing — a big speedboat (I guess; I know naught of boats) stuck at the top of a tree, probably in the aftermath of a flood.  Excited to have found what amounts to a free tree house, the boys climb up and begin to explore, only to find the lower deck stocked with fresh food, a sure sign someone else got there first.

Just minutes later, they meet exactly whom — a tall, lanky, grubby-looking character named Mud (McConaughey).  Though Neck is wary, Ellis is immediately taken in by Mud’s personality, and his story.  He’s there, he tells the boys, waiting for the love of his life, Juniper (Witherspoon), to show up so the two of them can run away together.  The hitch?  He killed her last boyfriend in a fight — protecting Juniper, he says — and that guy’s extremely violent family is out for revenge.  What he needs is for Ellis and Neck to get him the supplies necessary to get the boat down and running again, and to find Juniper and pass her a few notes about the plan.

Neck is pretty “no way,” but Ellis, currently watching his parents’ marriage — and thus his whole world — crumble around him, is inspired by Mud’s yarns of everlasting love in the face of strife.  Which is how he quickly finds himself smack in the middle of Mud’s problems, danger (physical and emotional) and all.

This is a really beautifully made and thoughtful film, with astonishingly solid acting chops on both the boys at its helm.  The kid who plays Ellis in particular (Tye Sheridan) exhibits an incredible depth in a very 14 year-old sort of way (“I know everything, I am brave; I know nothing, I am afraid” is how I would describe that way).  The river as metaphor for the unknown, unforeseeable, and slightly scary paths we travel as we grow up works as well as it always does (think Huck Finn).

McConaughey employs his usual charms here, but this time with a hint of the unbalanced thrown in for good measure and to good effect.  He also gets an A for effort at looking ugly, never easy for him, though in putting in the crooked teeth, they might’ve made them slightly less Tony-Curtis-in-The-Great-Race white (*gleam*).  Mud is a complicated man with a complicated past, and he’s battling a set of very serious demons, as well as more than one delusion.  Watching Ellis get sucked into the “romance” of Mud’s life, only to get a series of smacks in the face from reality in response, is an incredibly gripping and moving experience.

Also:  Sam Shepard.  ‘Nuff said.

Highly, highly recommended!

[Prequeue at Netflix | View trailer]

Genre: Drama
Cast:  Matthew McConaughey, Michael Shannon, Reese Witherspoon, Sam Shepard, Ray McKinnon, Tye Sheridan, Joe Don Baker, Jacob Lofland

MOVIE: Dark Tide (2012)

April 17, 2013

darktideA few recommendations I would like to make, having recently seen this film starring Halle Berry and her husband (!!) Olivier Martinez (note: I express “!!” because I had no idea they were married to each other, though that sure explains why they were in this stinker together):

1.  Shark divers, like cops, who are one day away from retirement should always call in sick that last day.  If you absolutely MUST go to work, do not do anything work-related whatsoever.  Especially if Halle Berry tells you to.

2.  Rich idiots who want to dive with Great White Sharks should just be dropped into a GWS feeding zone the first hour of the tour — none of this trying to talk them out of their “sharks would never bite ME because I am RICH” attitude.  They’re going to die a horrible death anyway.  Why wait until dusk when it’s that much harder to see them getting their comeuppance?

3.  Speaking of dusk, isn’t that, along with “dawn,” the time of day shark experts are always telling people NOT to go diving in shark-infested waters?  Because the sharks are more likely to attack at those times of day?  See above, re: don’t do anything Halle Berry tells you to do.

4. Why do I keep telling you not do anything Halle Berry tells you to do?  Because Halle Berry’s characters are always ruled by their emotions and those emotions totally get everybody killed in this movie, even though her character and all her character’s buddies keep trying to tell us none of it was her fault.  IT WAS TOTES ALL HER FAULT.

She does look really great in that bikini, though.  I’m assuming that was the primary reason she was cast in this shark bomb.

5.  If you decide to rent this movie because you, like me and my mom, are a total sucker for shark movies, allow me to suggest: NO.

[Netflix it  (available for Watch Now) | Buy it]

Genre:  Drama, SHARKS
Cast:  Halle Berry, Olivier Martinez, Ralph Brown, a bunch of other people you’ve never heard of

MOVIE: Killing Them Softly (2012)

April 1, 2013

killinghtmeThis movie is about a hit man, played by Brad Pitt, hired to take out two idiots who rob a poker. . .

. . . zzzzzzzz . . .

And then there’s something about Obama calling us a “community” but how we’re not really a community because everybody’s all alone in this miserable world of constant fakin’ it. The end.

(I don’t know — you watch it and tell me.)

[Netflix | Buy/Rent from Amazon]

Genre: Obfuscation
Cast:  Brad Pitt, Richard Jenkins, James Gandolfini, Ray Liotta, Scoot McNairy, Ben Mendelsohn, Vincent Curatola, Max Casella, Sam Shepard

MOVIE: Arbitrage (2012)

January 12, 2013

I actually saw this movie months and months ago — while it was out in theaters, it was also available for streaming via Amazon, and my husband and I rented it one night when we suddenly found ourselves — wonder of wonders! — home together AT  THE SAME TIME!  (An election season MIRACLE that all spouses of political reporters can surely relate to.)

It’s about a billionaire named Robert Miller (Richard Gere) who manages a hedge fund along with his eldest daughter Brooke.  On the surface, he seems to have the perfect life — heck, he’s even married to Susan Motherfrakkin’ Sarandon, for pity’s sake (Note: that’s not her real middle name, BUT IT SHOULD BE).  Underneath that idyllic exterior, though — well, not so much with the idyll.

As it turns out, you see, Miller’s been desperately trying to sell off that hedge fund, not so he can retire, as he keeps telling his family, but so he can get as far away from it as possible before anybody figures out he committed fraud a few years back to cover a loss he thought would be temporary (like that ever works out, you hedge fund knuckleheads).

Things go from bad to worse, though, the night Miller and his young mistress Julie decide to go for a drive and end up in a terrible car crash that leaves Miller all bruised up and Julie dead in the seat next to him.  Rather than calling the cops to report the accident, Miller moves Julie to the driver’s seat (it’s her car) and flees the scene, afraid the scandal will cost him the sale of the hedge fund he so desperately needs.

Tim Roth plays the detective called out to the accident scene, and can quickly tell the body’s placement in the car doesn’t add up (because he’s an expert on body language, dead or alive, ever since starring on that show Lie to Me, duh).  As with most movie detectives, he hates rich people, so when he hears a rumor Miller had a connection to the victim, he immediately goes after him like my kitten Otis with a ball of yarn.  No surface left unstringed, and no stopping until there is no string left to strung.  Or something more grammatically correct than that.

This movie doesn’t have a lot of originality in terms of storyline, but it’s still very compelling, and what drives that the most, in my opinion, is the complexity of Miller’s character.  Described here, he sounds like a total bastard, right?  He’s ripped people off to make a profit for himself, committed fraud, and left his dead girlfriend behind in a car in the middle of a freezing cold night, simply to avoid putting a crimp in his business style.  What an asshole!

The thing is, though, the more the movie progressed, the more I felt terrible for Miller instead of angry at him.  The scene in which Brooke confronts him about the fraud, after prepping the books for the sale of the fund and finding evidence of her father’s cookery, was an intensely powerful and painful one, and Gere’s performance was spot-on flawless.  He’s sort of playing a bad guy who doesn’t know he’s a bad guy, really.  He’s a man taken down by hubris, rather than simply by greed or conscious evil-doing, which makes him a much more interesting character than, say, Bernie Madoff.  He’s conflicted and complicated — and so is our reaction to him.

Arbitrage isn’t a movie that stands out all that much, I wouldn’t say.   It’s not one I’m likely to take the time to watch again, for example.  But it was a nice little surprise, well-written and strongly acted, and it’s one definitely worth a rental now that it’s out on DVD.  Recommended!

[Prequeue it at Netflix | Watch it now via Amazon]

Genre:  Drama
Cast:  Tim Roth, Richard Gere, Susan Sarandon, William Friedkin, Brit Marling, Monica Raymund

MOVIES: We Bought a Zoo (2012) and Zookeeper (2012)

January 12, 2013

Still playing 2012 catch-up — here are two movies about zoos I saw last year, neither of which really needs a full-length review, so both of which I’m going to haikiew (haiku-review) for you instead.  I enjoyed both of these films, and I think they’d be excellent picks for parents looking for funny, good-natured movies to watch with their kids, but they aren’t, like, brilliant or anything.

weboughtWe Bought a Zoo

Widower buys zoo
To save family from grief.
It’s cheesy but sweet.

Cast: Matt Damon, Scarlett Johansson, Thomas Haden Church, Patrick Fugit, Colin Ford, Elle Fanning, Angus Macfadyen, Peter Riegert
[Netflix it | Buy it]

zookeeperThe Zookeeper

Talking animals
Counsel lovelorn zookeeper.
Also cheesy but sweet!

(Hmm, notice a theme?)

Cast: Kevin James (kinda have a dorky crush on Kevin James, by the way, which is why I rented this one) Rosario Dawson, Leslie Bibb, Ken Jeong, Donnie Wahlberg, Nick Nolte, Adam Sandler, Sylvester Stallone, Cher, Judd Apatow
[Netflix it | Buy it]

MOVIE: Argo (2012)

January 10, 2013

argo [Another catch-up review from 2012!]

I feel like it’s fairly safe to assume everybody knows what this movie was about, but on the off chance you live under a rock, let me briefly synoposis-ize it for you.  (Holy crap, is that ever not a word.)

The story begins with the American embassy in Tehran in 1979, during the height of the Iranian Revolution.  When Iranians rioting outside the embassy finally bust through the doors, taking the entire staff hostage, a group of 6  Americans manage to sneak out the back, racing across the street to take refuge in the home of the Canadian ambassador.

As the hostages are tortured and terrified, it becomes clear to the Iranians in charge that they’re missing a few people.  They immediately launch a door-to-door search for any information about the Americans who escaped, with the threat of death upon anybody found guilty of harboring them.  Realizing it’s only a matter of time before the Americans are found, and the Canadian ambassador along with them, a CIA agent named Tony Mendez (Ben Affleck), comes up with a radical idea to get them out.  He’s going to pose as a Canadian filmmaker, go into the country under the guise of scouting for film locations for a new sci-fi movie, and then leave a few days later with the Americans in tow, posing as fellow filmmakers.

Now, here’s the thing.  This movie is based on a true story, and even if you didn’t know this specific story before you saw the movie, you surely knew the outcome of the 1979 Iranian hostage situation in general (heck, I was only six in 1979, and even I knew everybody got out of that one alive — of the hostages, anyway).  In other words, I knew exactly how this movie was going to end.  AND IT DIDN’T MATTER ONE BIT.

I spent the last half hour of this film so friggin’ tense, I practically had a panic attack right there in the theater.  The scene in the airport — my god!  I kept saying to myself, “They’ll get out!  They get out!!” and it kept not mattering a smidge.  That Affleck, who directed Argo as well as starring in it, is able to create that much suspense where no suspense should rightly be, proves him, in my mind, to be an absolutely masterful filmmaker.

Now, it’s possible Argo was a fluke, and Affleck’s next movie is going to be a dud (I wasn’t that impressed by The Town, his previous directorial outing, for example).  But man, this movie totally kicked my ass — it’s absolutely perfect from start to finish.  I loved every minute of it.  Great acting, great writing (complete with great humor (“Argo f*ck yourself!”)), great HAIR.  Just greatness, all ’round.  I have no doubt Affleck will be nominated for Best Director this year, and even though I think the Oscars are stupid and meaningless, for his sake, I’d love to see him win.

Good job, Benny.  Keep this up, and the world might finally forgive you for Gigli (in theory, anyway, if not in practice).

Highly, highly recommended!

[Prequeue it at Netflix]

Genre:  Drama
Cast: Ben Affleck, Taylor Schilling, Bryan Cranston, John Goodman, Kyle Chandler, Clea DuVall, Victor Garber, Alan Arkin, Titus Welliver, Adrienne Barbeau, Tate Donovan, Rory Cochrane, Chris Messina

MOVIE: The Master (2012)

October 22, 2012

Look, I’ve been trying to write a review of this movie for almost a month now, and I just can’t do it.   I sit down, think about what to say, and all I can come up with is, “Good goddamn.”

So, good goddamn, is all.  I thought it was brilliant (and, boy, is it ever a Paul Thomas Anderson film — he has a very distinctive style).  But it also hit kind of close to home for me in several spots, and that made it incredibly hard to watch and even harder to write about.   Go see it yourself and see what you think.  I’ll be over here trying to think about something else for a while.

[Prequeue at Netflix]

Genre: Drama
Cast: Joaquin Phoenix, Philip Seymour Hoffman, Amy Adams, Laura Dern, Jesse Plemons, Rami Malek.


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